16 March 2015

16 Steampunk Novel Recommendations

I do not read a lot of Steampunk but it is something I have definitely wanted to get in to for a little while now. For research I went to the wonder that is Goodreads (where all the following images and text come from and where all the links go too) and did a little browsing which I thought I would share with you.

Boneshaker (The Clockwork Century, #1)Soulless (Parasol Protectorate, #1)The Girl in the Steel Corset (Steampunk Chronicles, #1)Leviathan (Leviathan, #1)



Boneshaker by Cherie Priest: Russian prospectors commissioned inventor Leviticus Blue to create a great machine that could mine through Alaska’s ice. [...] Dr. Blue’s Incredible Bone-Shaking Drill Engine [was] born. But on its first test run the Boneshaker went terribly awry, destroying several blocks of downtown Seattle and unearthing a subterranean vein of blight gas that turned anyone who breathed it into the living dead.
Soulless by Gail Carriger: First, she has no soul. Second, she's a spinster whose father is both Italian and dead. Third, she was rudely attacked by a vampire, breaking all standards of social etiquette. Where to go from there?
The Girl in the Steel Corset by Kady Cross: In 1897 England, sixteen-year-old Finley Jayne has no one... except the "thing" inside her. When a young lord tries to take advantage of Finley, she fights back. And wins. But no normal Victorian girl has a darker side that makes her capable of knocking out a full-grown man with one punch...
Leviathan by Scott Westerfield: With World War I brewing, Alek and Deryn's paths cross in the most unexpected way…taking them on a fantastical, around-the-world adventure that will change both their lives forever.

The Golden Compass (His Dark Materials, #1)Clockwork Angel (The Infernal Devices, #1)Phoenix Rising (Ministry of Peculiar Occurrences, #1)The Difference Engine

The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman: In this multilayered narrative, however, nothing is as it seems. Lyra sets out for the top of the world in search of her kidnapped playmate, Roger, bearing a rare truth-telling instrument, the compass of the title. All around her children are disappearing—victims of so-called "Gobblers"—and being used as subjects in terrible experiments that separate humans from their daemons, creatures that reflect each person's inner being.
Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare: The year is 1878. Tessa Gray descends into London’s dark supernatural underworld in search of her missing brother. She soon discovers that her only allies are the demon-slaying Shadowhunters—including Will and Jem, the mysterious boys she is attracted to.
Phoenix Rising by Philippa Ballantine: In Victorian England, Londoners wash up dead on Thames, drained of blood and bone. Clandestine Ministry of Peculiar Occurrences is forbidden to investigate. But Eliza Braun, with bulletproof corset, fondness for dynamite, remarkable devices, drags along timorous new partner Wellington Books, of encyclopedic brain, against Phoenix intent on enslaving Britons.
The Difference Machine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling: 1855: The Industrial Revolution is in full and inexorable swing, powered by steam-driven cybernetic Engines. Charles Babbage perfects his Analytical Engine and the computer age arrives a century ahead of its time.

Incarceron (Incarceron, #1)Lady of Devices (Magnificent Devices, #1)The Iron Wyrm Affair (Bannon & Clare, #1)The Iron Thorn (Iron Codex, #1)

Incarceron by Catherine Fisher: Incarceron -- a futuristic prison, sealed from view, where the descendants of the original prisoners live in a dark world torn by rivalry and savagery. It is a terrifying mix of high technology -- a living building which pervades the novel as an ever-watchful, ever-vengeful character, and a typical medieval torture chamber -- chains, great halls, dungeons.
Lady of Devices by Shelley Adina: London, 1889. Claire Trevelyan 17 should be a lady, but prefers to invent explosive devices. When her father Viscount St Ives loses the estate, a new leader rises in London underworld, the Lady of Devices.
The Iron Wyrm Affair by Lilith Saintcrow: Emma Bannon, forensic sorceress in the service of the Empire, has a mission: to protect Archibald Clare, a failed, unregistered mentath. His skills of deduction are legendary, and her own sorcery is not inconsiderable. It doesn't help much that they barely tolerate each other
The Iron Throne by Caitlin Kittredge: In the city of Lovecraft, the Proctors rule and a great Engine turns below the streets, grinding any resistance to their order to dust. The necrovirus is blamed for Lovecraft's epidemic of madness, for the strange and eldritch creatures that roam the streets after dark, and for everything that the city leaders deem Heretical—born of the belief in magic and witchcraft.

Something Strange and Deadly (Something Strange and Deadly, #1)Airborn (Matt Cruse, #1)Steam & Sorcery (Gaslight Chronicles, #1)A Study in Silks (The Baskerville Affair, #1)

Something Strange and Deadly by Susan Dennard: Philadelphia 1876. The Dead are rising. A zombie delivers a letter to Eleanor Fitt. Whoever controls the Dead Army has her brother.
Airborn by Kenneth Oppel: In a swashbuckling adventure reminiscent of Jules Verne and Robert Louis Stevenson, Kenneth Oppel, author of the best-selling Silverwing trilogy, creates an imagined world in which the air is populated by transcontinental voyagers, pirates, and beings never before dreamed of by the humans who sail the skies.
Steam & Sorcery by Cindy Spender Pape: When conspiracy threatens to blur the distinction between humans and monsters, Caroline and Merrick must join forces, and the fate of humanity hinges upon their combined skills of steam and sorcery...
A Study in Silks by Emma Jane Holloway: In a Victorian era ruled by a ruthless steam baron council, mechanical power is the real monarch, and sorcery the demon enemy of the empire. Evelina has secretly mastered a coveted weapon - magic that can run machines.

I consider myself such a newbie in this genre but some of these sound really awesome. The brilliant thing is, pretty much every title is the first in a series so there is a lot of books to get sucked in to!

2 comments:

  1. You know, no matter how big the list gets, I always get excited to add more books on my to-read list! Thanks for sharing; some of these look fascinating!

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    1. My to-read recently went over 100 and I know for a fact I'll never get it back under that! Glad you liked the look of some of these ^^

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